Murder In Chinatown

Murder In Chinatown

Murder In Chinatown

In Chinatown to deliver a baby, Sarah Brandt meets a group of women she might otherwise never have come across: Irish girls who, after alighting on Ellis Island alone, have married Chinese men in the same predicament. But with bigotry in New York from every side, their mixed-race children are often treated badly, by the Irish, the Chinese—even the police. When the new mother’s half-Chinese, half-Irish, 15-year-old niece goes missing, Sarah knows that alerting the constables would prove futile. So she turns to Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy—and together they begin the search themselves. And after they find her, dead in an alley, Sarah and Malloy have ample suspects—from both sides of Canal Street.

Murder in Chinatown

Murder in Chinatown

Murder in Chinatown

When Peyton and Marco are pulled off the most significant case of their careers, they struggle to find their equilibrium. Marco's growing distance brings out Peyton's worst insecurities, and while everyone around her seems to be moving forward in their lives, she feels stuck.Assigned to investigate the murder of a reality star's boyfriend, Peyton questions whether her absolute dedication to her job is worth it. Then again, when she looks into the future, she doesn't see much more – except long nights filled with loneliness.

Bullets Before Dawn Murder in Chinatown

Bullets Before Dawn Murder in Chinatown

Bullets Before Dawn Murder in Chinatown

It's the year 1949. The war is over. NYC Detective Johnny Vero has been promoted to Lieutenant, . Griff, a Ex ship captain, now smuggles opium and Chinese women into New York's Chinatown. Murders are mounting as suspicions rise. In steps the FBI.

Bullets Before Dawn Murder in Chinatown

Bullets Before Dawn  Murder in Chinatown

Bullets Before Dawn Murder in Chinatown

It's the year 1949. The war is over. NYC Detective Johnny Vero has been promoted to Lieutenant partly as a result for capturing the serial killer, Jean-Paul Vincent in France the previous year with the help of Interpol. (Taken from the first novel in this series: Ten Cents a Dance.) Griff, a one-time freight ship captain now smuggles opium and Chinese women for prostitution into New York's Chinatown. Chinatown's boss, Mo China, is only allowed to keep his operation flowing from Griff's deliveries by the say-so of a crime boss, Alvise LaPoshio. Molly Penett, the first woman to be elected NYC's District Attorney, works with Detective Vero and forms an erotic relationship. Murders are mounting quickly as suspicions include the Chinatown factions, undercover detectives, and the Medical Examiner's office. In steps the FBI.

The Mayor of Dupont Street

The Mayor of Dupont Street

The Mayor of Dupont Street

The Mayor of Dupont Street is set in 1901 San Francisco and opens with the discovery of a grave on Market Street filled with dead Chinese men in what looks like a ceremonial ritual.Twelve-year-old Amanda, whose father is Chief of Detectives at the Battery Street police station, is fascinated by crime and criminals. She skips school with her little brother Peter to view the grave and begins an adventure that leads to the disappearance of Peter and a fascinating journey through Chinatown not only to find her brother but to solve the mystery of the dead Chinese men. In the process, she discovers a shocking connection between her family and the dead men and befriends a Chinese boy whose strange sister holds the answer to Peter's fate.

The Chinatown Trunk Mystery

The Chinatown Trunk Mystery

The Chinatown Trunk Mystery

In the summer of 1909, the gruesome murder of nineteen-year-old Elsie Sigel sent shock waves through New York City and the nation at large. The young woman's strangled corpse was discovered inside a trunk in the midtown Manhattan apartment of her reputed former Sunday school student and lover, a Chinese man named Leon Ling. Through the lens of this unsolved murder, Mary Ting Yi Lui offers a fascinating snapshot of social and sexual relations between Chinese and non-Chinese populations in turn-of-the-century New York City. Sigel's murder was more than a notorious crime, Lui contends. It was a clear signal that attempts to maintain geographical and social boundaries between the city's Chinese male and white female populations had failed. When police discovered Sigel and Leon Ling's love letters, giving rise to the theory that Leon Ling killed his lover in a fit of jealous rage, this idea became even more embedded in the public consciousness. New Yorkers condemned the work of Chinese missions and eagerly participated in the massive national and international manhunt to locate the vanished Leon Ling. Lui explores how the narratives of racial and sexual danger that arose from the Sigel murder revealed widespread concerns about interracial social and sexual mixing during the era. She also examines how they provoked far-reaching skepticism about regulatory efforts to limit the social and physical mobility of Chinese immigrants and white working-class and middle-class women. Through her thorough re-examination of this notorious murder, Lui reveals in unprecedented detail how contemporary politics of race, gender, and sexuality shaped public responses to the presence of Chinese immigrants during the Chinese exclusion era.

Tong Wars

Tong Wars

Tong Wars

A mesmerizing true story of money, murder, gambling, prostitution, and opium in a "wild ramble around Chinatown in its darkest days." (The New Yorker) Nothing had worked. Not threats or negotiations, not shutting down the betting parlors or opium dens, not house-to-house searches or throwing Chinese offenders into prison. Not even executing them. The New York DA was running out of ideas and more people were dying every day as the weapons of choice evolved from hatchets and meat cleavers to pistols, automatic weapons, and even bombs. Welcome to New York City’s Chinatown in 1925. The Chinese in turn-of-the-last-century New York were mostly immigrant peasants and shopkeepers who worked as laundrymen, cigar makers, and domestics. They gravitated to lower Manhattan and lived as Chinese an existence as possible, their few diversions—gambling, opium, and prostitution—available but, sadly, illegal. It didn’t take long before one resourceful merchant saw a golden opportunity to feather his nest by positioning himself squarely between the vice dens and the police charged with shutting them down. Tong Wars is historical true crime set against the perfect landscape: Tammany-era New York City. Representatives of rival tongs (secret societies) corner the various markets of sin using admirably creative strategies. The city government was already corrupt from top to bottom, so once one tong began taxing the gambling dens and paying off the authorities, a rival, jealously eyeing its lucrative franchise, co-opted a local reformist group to help eliminate it. Pretty soon Chinese were slaughtering one another in the streets, inaugurating a succession of wars that raged for the next thirty years. Scott D. Seligman’s account roars through three decades of turmoil, with characters ranging from gangsters and drug lords to reformers and do-gooders to judges, prosecutors, cops, and pols of every stripe and color. A true story set in Prohibition-era Manhattan a generation after Gangs of New York, but fought on the very same turf.

Grab a Snake by the Tail

Grab a Snake by the Tail

Grab a Snake by the Tail

Mario Conde investigates a murder in the Barrio Chino, the rundown Chinatown of Havana. Not his usual beat, but when Conde was asked to take the case by his colleague, the sultry, perfectly proportioned Lieutenant Patricia Chion, a frequent object of his nightly fantasies, he could n’t resist. The case proves to be unusual. Pedro Cuang, a lonely old man, is found hanging naked from a beam in the ceiling of his dingy room. One of his fingers has been amputated and a drawing of two arrows was engraved with a knife on his chest. Was this a ritual Santería killing or a just a sordid settling of accounts in a world of drug trafficking that began to infiltrate Cuban society in the 1980s? Soon Conde discovers unexpected connections, secret businesses and a history of misfortune, uprooting and loneliness that affected many immigrant families from China. As ever with Padura, the story is soaked in atmosphere: the drinking of rum in deliciously smoke-filled bars, the friendships, the food and beautiful women.

Organizing Crime in Chinatown

Organizing Crime in Chinatown

Organizing Crime in Chinatown

More than a century ago, organized criminals were intrinsically involved with the political, social, and economic life of the Chinese American community. In the face of virulent racism and substantial linguistic and cultural differences, they also integrated themselves successfully into the extensive underworlds and corrupt urban politics of the Progressive Era United States. The process of organizing crime in Chinese American communities can be attributed in part to the larger politics that created opportunities for professional criminals. For example, the illegal traffic in women, laborers, and opium was an unintended consequence of "yellow peril" laws meant to provide social control over Chinese Americans. Despite this hostile climate, Chinese professional criminals were able to form extensive multiethnic social networks and purchase protection and some semblance of entrepreneurial equality from corrupt politicians, police officers, and bureaucrats. While other Chinese Americans worked diligently to remove racist laws and regulations, Chinatown gangsters saw opportunity for profit and power at the expense of their own community. Academics, the media, and the government have claimed that Chinese organized crime is a new and emerging threat to the United States. Focusing on events and personalities, and drawing on intensive archival research in newspapers, police and court documents, district attorney papers, and municipal reports, as well as from contemporary histories and sociological treatments, this study tests that claim against the historical record.

Death at Chinatown

Death at Chinatown

Death at Chinatown

"In the summer of 1896, amateur sleuth Emily Cabot becomes involved in a murder investigation when a herbalist is poisoned in Chicago's original Chinatown"--